The story behind the painting

Dora Maar as 'The Weeping Woman'


Dora Maar is well known for her role as Picasso's lover, subject, and muse. As such, he painted many portraits of her. In the majority of these paintings, Dora Maar was represented as a tortured, anguished woman. ‘The Weeping Woman’ was very much inspired by the tragedies of the Spanish Civil War, and Picasso thought of Dora Maar as a living depiction of the pain and suffering that people experienced during this time. Dora, however, failed to appreciate Picasso depicting her in this way. When asked about this portrait, she said “all portraits of me are lies. They’re Picassos. Not one is Dora Maar”

Her liaison with Picasso, who physically abused her and made her fight Marie-Therese Walters for his love, ended in 1943. In 1944, Dora Maar had a nervous breakdown, choosing to have controversial electroshock treatment. Turning to Catholicism for her mental health Dora retired to the house Picasso bought for her and lived alone until she died in 1990.

David Henty’s ‘Weeping Woman’ is available @ www.cloudgalleryfineart or www.davidhentyart.co.uk



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© 2020 David Henty Art | Brighton, United Kingdom | david@davidhentyart.co.uk